How to Build a Bike: A Complete Guide for Beginners

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If you love cycling and want to have a bike that suits your needs and preferences, you might consider building your own bike from scratch. Building a bike can be a fun and rewarding project, but it also requires some planning, preparation, and skills. In this article, we will guide you through the steps of how to build a bike, from choosing the right parts to assembling them and testing your ride.

Whether you want to build a road bike, a mountain bike, a BMX bike, or something else, this guide will help you get started.

Benefits of Building A Bike of Your Own

There are many reasons why you might want to build your own bike instead of buying a ready-made one. Here are some of the benefits of building your own bike:

One of the biggest advantages of building your own bike is the ability to customize it to fit your style, needs, and budget. When you build your own bike, you have complete control over every aspect of the build. You can choose the frame size, shape, color, and material that suits you best. Whether you prefer a sleek road bike or a rugged mountain bike, you can build it exactly the way you want.

Not only can you choose the frame, but you can also select the components that match your riding style. From the wheels and tires to the brakes, gears, handlebars, saddle, and pedals, you can hand-pick each part to create the perfect setup for your riding preferences. This level of customization ensures that you will have a bike that is comfortable, efficient, and enjoyable to ride.

Building your own bike can also be a cost-effective option. While it’s true that high-end bike components can be expensive, building your own bike allows you to be more selective and find deals on parts. You can search for discounted components, compare prices, and even reuse parts from your old bike. By doing so, you can save money and still build a high-quality bike that suits your needs.

Third, building your own bike is a valuable learning experience that can deepen your understanding of how bikes work and how to maintain them. As you assemble the various components, you’ll gain a deeper appreciation for the mechanical intricacies that make a bike function. You’ll learn how each part interacts with the others and how to install, adjust, and repair different components.

This newfound knowledge not only empowers you to build your own bike, but it also makes you more self-reliant when it comes to maintaining and fixing any issues that may arise. Instead of relying on a bike shop for repairs, you’ll have the skills and confidence to troubleshoot and fix problems on your own. This can save you time, money, and the hassle of waiting for repairs.

Last but not least, building your own bike is a creative and enjoyable process that allows you to express yourself. You can experiment with different combinations of parts, colors, and styles to create a unique bike that reflects your personality and preferences. It’s like putting together a puzzle, where each piece contributes to the overall picture.

Additionally, building your own bike gives you a sense of pride in your work. You can show off your creation to your friends and family, sharing the story behind each component choice and the satisfaction of riding a bike that you built with your own hands.

What Do You Need to Build A Bike of Your Own

Before you start building your own bike, you need to prepare the necessary bicycle parts, and at the same time have some basic tools ready. Here is a list of what you need:

Bicycle Parts:

A frame: This is the main structure of your bike that holds all the other parts together. You can buy a new frame or use an old one from another bike. Make sure the frame is the right size for you and compatible with the parts you want to use.

A fork: This is the part that connects the front wheel to the frame and allows you to steer the bike. You can buy a new fork or use an old one from another bike. Make sure the fork matches the frame size and has the right steerer tube diameter and length for your headset.

A headset: This is the part that allows the fork to rotate smoothly inside the frame. You can buy a new headset or use an old one from another bike. Make sure the headset fits the frame and fork dimensions and has the right type (threaded or threadless) for your stem.

A stem: This is the part that connects the handlebars to the fork steerer tube. You can buy a new stem or use an old one from another bike. Make sure the stem has the right length, angle, and clamp diameter for your handlebars and fork.

Handlebars: These are the parts that you hold on to while riding and control the steering of the bike. You can buy new handlebars or use old ones from another bike. Make sure the handlebars have the right width, shape, and material for your riding style and comfort.

Grips or tape: These are the parts that cover the handlebars and provide cushioning and grip for your hands. You can buy new grips or tape or use old ones from another bike. Make sure they are in good condition and fit snugly on your handlebars.

Brake levers: These are the parts that you squeeze to activate the brakes on your bike. You can buy new brake levers or use old ones from another bike. Make sure they are compatible with your brakes and handlebars and have the right shape and size for your hands.

Shifters: These are the parts that you use to change gears on your bike. You can buy new shifters or use old ones from another bike. Make sure they are compatible with your drivetrain (chainring, cassette, chain, derailleur) and handlebars and have the right number of speeds for your gears.

Brakes: These are the parts that slow down or stop your bike when you apply pressure on the brake levers. You can buy new brakes or use old ones from another bike. Make sure they are compatible with your wheels (rim or disc) and frame (mounting type) and have enough power and modulation for your riding style.

Wheels: These are the parts that roll on the ground and support your weight on the bike. You can buy new wheels or use old ones from another bike. Make sure they are compatible with your frame (axle type) and brakes (rim or disc) and have the right size (diameter), width, and material for your riding style and terrain.

Tires: These are the parts that cover the wheels and provide traction and cushioning on the ground. You can buy new tires or use old ones from another bike. Make sure they are compatible with your wheels (rim or tubeless) and have the right size (diameter and width), tread pattern, and pressure for your riding style and terrain.

Tubes or sealant: These are the parts that hold air inside the tires and prevent them from going flat. You can buy new tubes or sealant or use old ones from another bike. Make sure they are compatible with your tires (size and valve type) and have enough air for your riding style and terrain.

A seatpost: This is the part that connects the saddle to the frame and allows you to adjust the height of your seat. You can buy a new seatpost or use an old one from another bike. Make sure the seatpost has the right diameter, length, and material for your frame and saddle.

A saddle: This is the part that you sit on while riding your bike. You can buy a new saddle or use an old one from another bike. Make sure the saddle has the right shape, size, and material for your comfort and riding style.

A seat clamp: This is the part that secures the seatpost to the frame and prevents it from slipping. You can buy a new seat clamp or use an old one from another bike. Make sure the seat clamp has the right diameter and type (bolt or quick release) for your frame and seatpost.

A bottom bracket: This is the part that allows the crankset to rotate smoothly inside the frame. You can buy a new bottom bracket or use an old one from another bike. Make sure the bottom bracket fits the frame (shell type and width) and crankset (spindle type and length) and has good bearings.

A crankset: This is the part that connects the pedals to the chainring and transfers your pedaling power to the drivetrain. You can buy a new crankset or use an old one from another bike. Make sure the crankset has the right number of chainrings, size of chainrings, length of arms, and material for your drivetrain and riding style.

Pedals: These are the parts that you push with your feet to turn the crankset and move the bike. You can buy new pedals or use old ones from another bike. Make sure the pedals have the right type (flat or clipless), size, shape, and material for your shoes and riding style.

A chainring: This is the part that attaches to the crankset and has teeth that engage with the chain. You can buy a new chainring or use an old one from another bike. Make sure the chainring has the right number of teeth, bolt circle diameter, shape, and material for your drivetrain and riding style.

A cassette: This is the part that attaches to the rear wheel hub and has sprockets that engage with the chain. You can buy a new cassette or use an old one from another bike. Make sure the cassette has the right number of sprockets, range of sprockets, spacing of sprockets, and material for your drivetrain and riding style.

A chain: This is the part that connects the chainring to the cassette and transfers your pedaling power to the rear wheel. You can buy a new chain or use an old one from another bike. Make sure the chain has the right length, width, speed, type (regular or master link), and condition for your drivetrain.

A rear derailleur: This is the part that moves the chain across the cassette sprockets when you shift gears on your bike. You can buy a new rear derailleur or use an old one from another bike. Make sure the rear derailleur has the right speed, cage length, capacity, compatibility, mounting type (direct mount or hanger), shape, size, and material for your drivetrain.

A front derailleur: This is the part that moves the chain across the chainring when you shift gears on your bike. You can buy a new front derailleur or use an old one from another bike. Make sure the front derailleur has the right speed, cage type (top swing or bottom swing), cable routing (top pull or bottom pull), compatibility, mounting type (clamp-on or braze-on), shape, size, and material for your drivetrain.

Brake cables: These are the parts that connect the brake levers to the brakes and transmit your braking force to them. You can buy new brake cables or use old ones from another bike. Make sure the brake cables have the right length, diameter, housing type (compressionless or standard), end caps (ferrules), cable ends (nipples), condition, and color for your brakes.

Shifter cables: These are the parts that connect the shifters to the derailleurs and transmit your shifting commands to them. You can buy new shifter cables or use old ones from another bike. Make sure the shifter cables have the right length, diameter, housing type (compressionless or standard), end caps (ferrules), cable ends (nipples), condition, and color for your derailleurs.

Tools Needed

A chain tool: This is a tool that you use to break and join the chain links. You can buy a new chain tool or use an old one from another bike. Make sure the chain tool is compatible with your chain speed and type.

A cassette tool: This is a tool that you use to install and remove the cassette from the rear wheel hub. You can buy a new cassette tool or use an old one from another bike. Make sure the cassette tool matches the lockring type and size of your cassette.

A crank puller: This is a tool that you use to remove the crank arms from the bottom bracket spindle. You can buy a new crank puller or use an old one from another bike. Make sure the crank puller fits the thread type and size of your crank arms.

A pedal wrench: This is a tool that you use to install and remove the pedals from the crank arms. You can buy a new pedal wrench or use an old one from another bike. Make sure the pedal wrench has the right size and shape for your pedals.

A hex wrench set: This is a set of tools that you use to tighten and loosen various bolts and screws on your bike. You can buy a new hex wrench set or use an old one from another bike. Make sure the hex wrench set has the right sizes for your bike parts.

A torque wrench: This is a tool that you use to apply the correct amount of force when tightening bolts and screws on your bike. You can buy a new torque wrench or use an old one from another bike. Make sure the torque wrench has the right range and units for your bike parts.

A screwdriver set: This is a set of tools that you use to adjust various settings on your bike, such as the limit screws on your derailleurs. You can buy a new screwdriver set or use an old one from another bike. Make sure the screwdriver set has the right types and sizes for your bike parts.

A cable cutter: This is a tool that you use to cut and trim your brake and shifter cables and housings. You can buy a new cable cutter or use an old one from another bike. Make sure the cable cutter is sharp and clean.

A tape measure: This is a tool that you use to measure various dimensions on your bike, such as the frame size, seat height, stem length, etc. You can buy a new tape measure or use an old one from another bike. Make sure the tape measure is accurate and easy to read.

A grease gun: This is a tool that you use to apply grease to various parts of your bike, such as the bottom bracket, headset, pedals, etc. You can buy a new grease gun or use an old one from another bike. Make sure the grease gun is clean and has enough grease for your bike parts.

A work stand: This is a device that you use to hold your bike in place while you work on it. You can buy a new work stand or use an old one from another bike. Make sure the work stand is stable, adjustable, and compatible with your frame type.

A floor pump: This is a device that you use to inflate your tires to the desired pressure. You can buy a new floor pump or use an old one from another bike. Make sure the floor pump has a gauge, a hose, and a valve head that fit your tire valve type.

How to Build A Bike of Your Own: Step by Step

Now that you have all the tools and materials ready, you can start building your own bike by following these steps:

Step 1: Prepare Your Frame

The first step is to prepare your frame for installing other parts. Here are some things you need to do:

  1. Clean your frame with a rag and some degreaser if it is dirty or greasy.
  2. Check your frame for any cracks, dents, rust, or damage that might affect its strength or performance.
  3. Apply some grease to the threads of the bottom bracket shell, headset cups, seat tube, and any other threaded parts on the frame.
  4. Install the bottom bracket into the frame using the bottom bracket tool and the torque wrench. Make sure the bottom bracket is tight and aligned with the frame.
  5. Install the headset into the frame using the headset press or the hammer and the wood block. Make sure the headset cups are flush with the frame and the bearings are smooth.
  6. Install the fork into the frame by sliding the steerer tube through the headset. Make sure the fork is compatible with the frame and the headset and has enough steerer tube length for the stem and the spacers.
  7. Install the stem onto the fork steerer tube by placing the spacers and the stem cap on top of the fork and tightening the stem bolt with the hex wrench. Make sure the stem is aligned with the fork and has the right height and angle for your comfort and handling.
  8. Install the seatpost into the frame by sliding it into the seat tube and tightening the seat clamp with the hex wrench. Make sure the seatpost is compatible with the frame and has the right diameter, length, and material for your saddle.

Step 2: Install Your Handlebars

The next step is to install your handlebars on your stem. Here are some things you need to do:

  1. Choose your handlebars according to your riding style, comfort, and preference. You can choose from different types of handlebars, such as drop bars, flat bars, riser bars, bullhorn bars, etc.
  2. Install your handlebars on your stem by loosening the stem bolts with the hex wrench and sliding the handlebars into the stem clamp. Make sure the handlebars are compatible with the stem and have the right width, shape, and material for your riding style and comfort.
  3. Tighten the stem bolts with the torque wrench according to the manufacturer’s specifications. Make sure the handlebars are secure and aligned with the stem and the front wheel.
  4. Install your grips or tape on your handlebars by sliding them over the ends of the handlebars and securing them with glue, tape, or plugs. Make sure the grips or tape are in good condition and fit snugly on your handlebars.
  5. Install your brake levers on your handlebars by loosening the clamp bolts with the hex wrench and sliding them onto the handlebars. Make sure the brake levers are compatible with your brakes and handlebars and have the right shape and size for your hands.
  6. Adjust the position and angle of your brake levers according to your comfort and preference. You can use a tape measure to ensure that they are symmetrical on both sides of the handlebars.
  7. Tighten the clamp bolts with the torque wrench according to the manufacturer’s specifications. Make sure the brake levers are secure and easy to reach.
  8. Install your shifters on your handlebars by loosening the clamp bolts with the hex wrench and sliding them onto the handlebars. Make sure the shifters are compatible with your drivetrain and handlebars and have the right number of speeds for your gears.
  9. Adjust the position and angle of your shifters according to your comfort and preference. You can use a tape measure to ensure that they are symmetrical on both sides of the handlebars.
  10. Tighten the clamp bolts with the torque wrench according to the manufacturer’s specifications. Make sure the shifters are secure and easy to operate.

Step 3: Install Your Brakes

The third step is to install your brakes on your frame and wheels. Here are some things you need to do:

  1. Choose your brakes according to your riding style, terrain, and preference. You can choose from different types of brakes, such as rim brakes, disc brakes, caliper brakes, cantilever brakes, etc.
  2. Install your brakes on your frame and wheels by following the instructions of the manufacturer or the related guides . Make sure the brakes are compatible with your frame (mounting type), wheels (rim or disc), brake levers, brake cables, etc.
  3. Adjust your brakes according to the instructions of the manufacturer or some guides. Make sure your brakes have enough power, modulation, clearance, alignment, etc.
  4. Install your brake cables from your brake levers to your brakes by following the instructions of the manufacturer or the related guides . Make sure your brake cables have enough length, diameter, housing type, end caps, cable ends, etc.
  5. Cut and trim your brake cables using the cable cutter. Make sure you leave enough slack for turning but not too much that they interfere with other parts.
  6. Test your brakes by squeezing your brake levers and spinning your wheels. Make sure they stop smoothly and evenly without rubbing or squeaking.

Step 4: Install Your Wheels

The fourth step is to install your wheels on your frame. Here are some things you need to do:

  1. Choose your wheels according to your riding style, terrain, and preference. You can choose from different types of wheels, such as clincher wheels, tubular wheels, tubeless wheels, etc.
  2. Install your wheels on your frame by inserting the axles into the dropouts and securing them with the quick release skewers or the nuts. Make sure the wheels are compatible with your frame (axle type), brakes (rim or disc), cassette, etc.
  3. Adjust your wheels according to the instructions of the manufacturer or the related guides. Make sure your wheels are true, balanced, centered, and tensioned.
  4. Install your tires on your wheels by following the instructions of the manufacturer or the related guides. Make sure your tires are compatible with your wheels (rim or tubeless) and have the right size (diameter and width), tread pattern, and pressure for your riding style and terrain.
  5. Install your tubes or sealant inside your tires by following the instructions of the manufacturer or the related guides. Make sure your tubes or sealant are compatible with your tires (size and valve type) and have enough air for your riding style and terrain.
  6. Test your wheels by spinning them and checking for any wobbling, rubbing, or punctures.

Step 5: Install Your Drivetrain

The fifth step is to install your drivetrain on your frame and wheels. Here are some things you need to do:

  1. Choose your drivetrain according to your riding style, terrain, and preference. You can choose from different types of drivetrains, such as single speed, fixed gear, multi-speed, etc.
  2. Install your crankset on your bottom bracket by sliding the spindle through the bottom bracket bearings and tightening the bolts with the hex wrench. Make sure the crankset is compatible with the bottom bracket (spindle type and length) and has the right number of chainrings, size of chainrings, length of arms, and material for your drivetrain and riding style.
  3. Install your pedals on your crank arms by screwing them into the threads with the pedal wrench. Make sure the pedals are compatible with the crank arms (thread type and size) and have the right type (flat or clipless), size, shape, and material for your shoes and riding style.
  4. Install your chainring on your crankset by aligning the bolt holes and tightening the bolts with the hex wrench. Make sure the chainring is compatible with the crankset (bolt circle diameter) and has the right number of teeth, shape, and material for your drivetrain and riding style.
  5. Install your cassette on your rear wheel hub by sliding it onto the freehub body and securing it with the lockring using the cassette tool. Make sure the cassette is compatible with the rear wheel hub (freehub type) and has the right number of sprockets, range of sprockets, spacing of sprockets, and material for your drivetrain and riding style.
  6. Install your chain on your drivetrain by wrapping it around the chainring and the cassette sprockets and joining it with the chain tool. Make sure the chain is compatible with your drivetrain (speed, width, type) and has the right length, condition, etc.
  7. Install your rear derailleur on your frame by attaching it to the derailleur hanger or the direct mount using the hex wrench. Make sure the rear derailleur is compatible with your drivetrain (speed, cage length, capacity) and has the right shape, size, material, etc.
  8. Install your front derailleur on your frame by clamping it onto the seat tube or bolting it onto the braze-on using the hex wrench. Make sure the front derailleur is compatible with your drivetrain (speed, cage type) and has the right shape, size, material, etc.
  9. Install your shifter cables from your shifters to your derailleurs by following the instructions of the manufacturer or the related guides . Make sure your shifter cables have enough length, diameter, housing type, end caps, cable ends, etc.
  10. Cut and trim your shifter cables using the cable cutter. Make sure you leave enough slack for shifting but not too much that they interfere with other parts.
  11. Adjust your derailleurs according to the instructions of the manufacturer or the related guides. Make sure your derailleurs are aligned, tensioned, indexed, and have the right limit settings for your drivetrain.
  12. Test your drivetrain by pedaling and shifting gears. Make sure your drivetrain runs smoothly and quietly without skipping, slipping, or rubbing.

Step 6: Install Your Saddle

The sixth step is to install your saddle on your seatpost. Here are some things you need to do:

  1. Choose your saddle according to your comfort, riding style, and preference. You can choose from different types of saddles, such as leather saddles, gel saddles, foam saddles, etc.
  2. Install your saddle on your seatpost by loosening the seatpost clamp with the hex wrench and sliding the saddle rails into the seatpost clamp. Make sure the saddle is compatible with the seatpost and has the right shape, size, and material for your comfort and riding style.
  3. Adjust the position and angle of your saddle according to your comfort and preference. You can use a tape measure and a level to ensure that your saddle is level and centered on the seatpost.
  4. Tighten the seatpost clamp with the torque wrench according to the manufacturer’s specifications. Make sure the saddle is secure and stable on the seatpost.

Step 7: Test Your Bike

The final step is to test your bike and make sure everything works properly. Here are some things you need to do:

  1. Check all the bolts and screws on your bike and make sure they are tight and secure.
  2. Check all the cables and housings on your bike and make sure they are not frayed, kinked, or damaged.
  3. Check all the parts on your bike and make sure they are not loose, worn, or broken.
  4. Check the tire pressure on your bike and make sure it is within the recommended range for your tires.
  5. Check the brakes on your bike and make sure they are working properly.
  6. Check the gears on your bike and make sure they are shifting smoothly.
  7. Check the alignment of your wheels and make sure they are not wobbling or rubbing.
  8. Check the balance of your wheels and make sure they are not heavy or light on one side.
  9. Check the true of your wheels and make sure they are not bent or warped.
  10. Check the tension of your wheels and make sure they are not too tight or too loose.
  11. Check the chain on your bike and make sure it is not too long or too short.
  12. Check the lubrication of your bike and make sure it is not too dry or too wet.
  13. Check the fit of your bike and make sure it is comfortable and ergonomic for you.
  14. Ride your bike on a safe and smooth surface and test its performance, handling, stability, etc. Make any adjustments or corrections as needed.

Different Types of Bikes and Styles That You Can Built from Scratch

There are many different types of bikes and styles that can be built from scratch depending on your riding style, terrain, and preference. Here are some of the most common types of bikes and styles that can be built from scratch:

  • Road bike: A road bike is a type of bike that is designed for riding on paved roads and smooth surfaces. A road bike usually has a lightweight frame, narrow tires, drop handlebars, and multiple gears. A road bike is ideal for speed, efficiency, and long-distance riding.
  • Mountain bike: A mountain bike is a type of bike that is designed for riding on rough terrain and off-road trails. A mountain bike usually has a sturdy frame, wide tires, flat handlebars, and suspension forks. A mountain bike is ideal for stability, traction, and shock absorption.
  • BMX bike: A BMX bike is a type of bike that is designed for performing tricks and stunts on ramps, jumps, and street obstacles. A BMX bike usually has a small frame, thick tires, upright handlebars, and a single gear. A BMX bike is ideal for agility, maneuverability, and fun.
  • Gravel bike: A gravel bike is a type of bike that is designed for riding on mixed surfaces and unpaved roads. A gravel bike usually has a versatile frame, medium tires, drop or flat handlebars, and multiple gears. A gravel bike is ideal for adventure, exploration, and versatility.
  • Hybrid bike: A hybrid bike is a type of bike that is designed for general-purpose riding on various terrains and conditions. A hybrid bike usually has a comfortable frame, medium tires, flat or riser handlebars, and multiple gears. A hybrid bike is ideal for commuting, fitness, and leisure.

Tips and Tricks for Finding the Best Deals on Parts and Components for Building Your Own Bike

Building your own bike can be a cost-effective way to get a custom-made bike that suits your needs and preferences, but it can also be a pricey project if you don’t know how to find the best deals on parts and components. Here are some tips and tricks for finding the best deals on parts and components for building your own bike:

  • Shop online: Online shopping can offer you a wider selection, lower prices, and more convenience than shopping in physical stores. You can compare different products, brands, and models, read reviews, and find discounts, coupons, and free shipping offers.
  • Look for sales: Sales are a great way to save money and get quality parts and components for building your own bike. You can look for sales on online platforms, such as Amazon, eBay, AliExpress, etc., or on local bike shops, websites, or forums.
  • Buy used: Buying used parts and components can be a smart way to get good parts and components for building your own bike at a fraction of the cost of new ones. You can buy used parts and components from online platforms, such as Craigslist, Facebook Marketplace, OfferUp, etc., or from local bike shops, websites, or forums.
  • Reuse old: Reusing old parts and components from your old bike or from other bikes can be a creative way to get unique parts and components for building your own bike without spending any money. You can reuse old parts and components that are still in good condition, such as frames, forks, wheels, tires, brakes, etc., or you can modify them to fit your new bike.
  • Trade or swap: Trading or swapping parts and components with other bike enthusiasts can be a fun way to get new parts and components for building your own bike while getting rid of the ones you don’t need or want. You can trade or swap parts and components with other bike enthusiasts through online platforms, such as Reddit, BikeExchange, Pinkbike, etc., or through local bike shops, websites, or forums.

Common Mistakes and Pitfalls to Avoid When Building Your Own Bike

Building your own bike can be a rewarding experience that can give you a sense of accomplishment and satisfaction, but it can also be a frustrating one if you make some common mistakes or pitfalls that can ruin your project. Here are some of the common mistakes and pitfalls to avoid when building your own bike:

  1. Not doing enough research: Research is essential when building your own bike. You need to do enough research on the type of bike you want to build, the parts and components you need to use, the tools and skills you need to have, the instructions and guides you need to follow, etc.
  1. Not planning ahead: Planning ahead is crucial when building your own bike. You need to plan ahead on the budget you have, the time you need, the space you have, the order you need to follow, etc.
  1. Not checking compatibility: Compatibility is important when building your own bike. You need to check compatibility between different parts and components before buying or installing them. You need to check compatibility between the frame size and shape, the fork steerer tube diameter and length, the headset type and size, the stem clamp diameter and length, the handlebar width and shape, the brake lever shape and size, the shifter speed and type, the brake type and mounting, the wheel size and axle type, the tire size and valve type, the seatpost diameter and length, the saddle shape and size, the bottom bracket shell type and width, the crankset spindle type and length, the chainring bolt circle diameter and number of teeth, the cassette range and spacing, the chain speed and width, the rear derailleur speed and capacity, the front derailleur cage type and cable routing, etc.
  1. Not using the right tools: Tools are essential when building your own bike. You need to use the right tools for installing, adjusting, and repairing different parts and components on your bike. You need to use tools such as a chain tool, a cassette tool, a crank puller, a pedal wrench, a hex wrench set, a torque wrench, a screwdriver set, a cable cutter, a tape measure, a grease gun, a work stand, a floor pump, etc.
  1. Not following the instructions: Instructions are important when building your own bike. You need to follow the instructions of the manufacturer or the related guides when installing, adjusting, and testing different parts and components on your bike. You need to follow the instructions carefully and correctly to avoid any errors or damages that might affect your bike’s performance or safety.
  1. Not testing your bike: Testing your bike is important when building your own bike. You need to test your bike before riding it on the road or trail to make sure everything works properly and safely. You need to test your bike by checking all the bolts and screws, cables and housings, parts and components, tire pressure, brakes, gears, wheels alignment, balance, true, tension etc. You also need to test your bike by riding it on a safe and smooth surface and testing its performance handling stability etc.

Conclusion

Congratulations! You have successfully built your own bike from scratch. You can now enjoy riding your custom-made bike that suits your needs and preferences. Building a bike can be a fun and rewarding project that can also help you learn more about how bikes work and how to maintain them. We hope this guide was helpful for you to build your own bike. Happy cycling!

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AUTHOR

Randy Joycelyn

Randy is the founder and editor of Cycling Soigneur. He has been passionate about cycling since he was a kid. He has been riding bikes for over 10 years. Cycling has just become a part of life.

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